Here is some guidance about how to get started, information for students, as well as useful tips and frequently asked questions to help you to get the most out of your research. The content reflects the attitudes or language of the period in which the records were created and does not reflect the views of Archives New Zealand. We have research guides It can be helpful to keep this in mind when starting your research. Find out what we have available to view online here. You can only order up to five items at a time, and that it takes time to retrieve items to the reading room. It is useful to structure your research around key events in a person’s life, for example, birth, death, marriage, education and immigration. Maintenance: Due to maintenance in our Wellington repository, you may be unable to order some records through our online finding aid, Archway, between 2 and 23 October. Remember to always keep a list of the archives you have consulted in your research. Maintenance: Due to maintenance in our Wellington repository, you may be unable to order some records through our online finding aid, Archway, between 2 and 23 October. Archives New Zealand is a rich source of records on family history for both Māori and Pakeha. Many archives are handwritten documents and not always easy to read. There are many ways in which people interact with government. Archival materials are historical documents, and may contain content that is racist, sexist or otherwise offensive. Reference lists and bibliographies in published books and articles are a good starting point. We are unable to carry out extended research on your behalf. While you cannot eat or drink in the reading rooms, there are break out spaces available. Using an archive can be quite different to using a library. Look at their sources lists or bibliographies to find what archives other researchers on this topic have consulted. For example, the Chinese poll tax books were created to document Chinese immigrants to New Zealand. Try searching our Flickr page for photographs, or Archway for digital copies of records. Records. COVID-19: From Thursday, October 8 our Auckland Reading Room will join our other reading rooms in being open as normal. Not sure where to begin your research journey? Try using different words or spellings in your searches. The reading rooms are for self directed and private research. It is worth noting that our guides are not comprehensive and can only cover a small proportion of what we have. This is important for your bibliographies or reference lists and is evidence of the work you have done. Do some research about your topic to get an idea of what records connected to your topic. for further information. Make careful and consistent notes about what records you’ve looked at, so that you don’t forget or need to repeat your work later. Give yourself plenty of time for your research. For example, if someone died accidentally a coroner’s inquest report may have been created. Our archivists may also be able to help, and there are resources available online for reading historic handwriting. We don’t provide USB sticks or memory cards. Wellington also has a public café onsite. We publish regular updates and news about government information management on our What's new page. We have research guides that cover the most requested records within our holdings by topic. There are some power outlets available, but we don’t provide charging cables. and the Public Records Act 2005 (PRA). Our opening hours are available on our contact us page. Be open minded about what records might contain the information you’re searching for and try to search broadly. Now we use the term mental health. These are designed to fit within industry best practice standards. These records are held in various formats and can be difficult to access. COVID-19: From Thursday, October 8 our Auckland Reading Room will join our other reading rooms in being open as normal.Bookings will no longer be required. Today these are often used as valuable sources of family history. Primary sources are original records created in the moment of an event or first hand accounts of the event. Write down the full archive reference numbers and titles of the items you view and keep this somewhere handy. A teacher or lecturer can help you to narrow down your research area. We recommend using one of the following groups if you want to hire a private researcher: New Zealand Society of Genealogists or check out advertisements in their magazine. Check out our guide to citing archival records Resources and guides for information managers. In a library you might search by author or subject, but in an archive, you need to consider who made the record. For further information please contact us through our ask an archivist service. These research guides highlight some of our frequently used archives. Good recordkeeping also means that you can cite your research properly and support your findings with solid evidence. For further information please contact us through our ask an archivist service. Our archives contain records created and used by the New Zealand Government, dating from around 1840 to the recent past. Be specific about what archives you want to find - it can be hard to search for broad general topics in archive collections. Archives can be a useful place to find examples of primary historical sources. Maintenance: Due to maintenance in our Wellington repository, you may be unable to order some records through our online finding aid, Archway, between 2 and 23 October. If you’re not sure, try looking at secondary sources such as published books or articles about your topic. These research guides highlight some of our frequently used archives. Our opening hours are available on our contact us page. For example, in the 1800s the term ‘lunatic’ was often used to describe people suffering from mental illness. For further information please contact us through our ask an archivist service. Take breaks. These include oil paintings, water colours, drawings, prints and posters, as well as several thousand photographic images. They are organised by topic, and provide details of the archives we have, how to … If you’re not sure about what you’re trying to find check some secondary sources first. Our opening hours are available on our contact us page. You want to have enough time to read through the records you have ordered. To see if we have what you need online, visit our What's been digitised Guidance for public sector organisations on how to legally dispose of information and records, Guidance on the requirements for transferring digital or physical information and records to our archives, Guidance on how to appraise information and records and the benefits for your organisation, Resources and guidance relating to statutory obligations for regulated organisations under the Information and Records Management Standard, Guidance on governance for effective information and records management supporting business functions and operations, Guidance on maintaining and managing information and records systems with your organisation, Guidance on the operational implementation of records and information management, Te hoatu taurewa i ngā mauhanga kāwanatanga, He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni, The Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand, Open Government Third National Action Plan, Proactive release of official information, Information and Records Management Standard. Our opening hours are available on our contact us page.. Family Search - Record Search (including digitised indexes to some of our holdings), Friends of the Dorothy Neal White Collection, School Library Association of New Zealand Aotearoa, Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa, Library and Information Advisory Commission, Professional Historians' Association of New Zealand/Aotearoa, Royal New Zealand Returned Services Association, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Melvyl - the Catalog of the University of California, United States Department of Agriculture - National Agricultural Library, United States National Library of Medicine, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, Foundation of Rail Organisations of New Zealand, National Oral History Association of New Zealand, New Zealand Government (Links to all NZ Government sites), Guidance for searching for records using our online search tool Archway, Guides organised by topic to assist your research, Find out about what archives are available to view online, Te hoatu taurewa i ngā mauhanga kāwanatanga, He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni, The Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand, Open Government Third National Action Plan, Proactive release of official information, Making the most of your time in the reading rooms, guide to the different types of primary and secondary sources. These will show you what sources the authors consulted during their research and can be helpful for your own research. It's good practice to keep your own clear records of what you have viewed and the information you have found. Primary sources can be viewed online if they have been digitised. Make sure you have enough memory on your devices. that cover the most requested records within our holdings by topic. Language use changes over time. Our holdings are organised by which government agency created the records, rather than what the records are about. Research can take a long time to complete and you may end up using many different records in the process. We hold records created by New Zealand government agencies, such as the Ministry of Justice or the Department of Internal Affairs. Bookings will no longer be required. This means that you are responsible for doing your own research. Think about which government agency might have created the record you’re looking for. Bookings will no longer be required. Prioritise your requests. Archive records come in all sorts of shapes and sizes - some can be several hundred pages long. How might the subject have interacted with the government in the creation of a record? COVID-19: From Thursday, October 8 our Auckland Reading Room will join our other reading rooms in being open as normal. This means that you can refer to them later and correct any mistakes made while writing down information. COVID-19: From Thursday, October 8 our Auckland Reading Room will join our other reading rooms in being open as normal.Bookings will no longer be required. Our guides and resources are designed to assist Information Managers in meeting the minimum requirements as laid out by the Information and Records Management Standard.

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